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Do You Know Questions You Should Be Asking a Hiring Manager?

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Many candidates make the mistake of assuming they’ll be the only one in the hot seat during a job interview, but it’s actually a two-way street. The hiring manager will ask plenty of questions to gauge your fit for both the position and the company, and you’re expected to do the same.

As a talented professional, you don’t have to accept every job you’re offered, so performing proper due diligence will allow you to make an informed decision. You’ll also impress the hiring manager with your genuine desire to learn as much as possible during the interview.

5 Questions to Ask a Hiring Manager

 

1. Is this a new position? If not, why did the last person leave?

 

Finding out whether or not the job is newly created is very telling. If you’d be the first person to hold the position, you’ll learn more about why it was added and what the hiring manager hopes to achieve with it. On the other hand, if it’s not a new position, learning where its previous occupant went might help you envision what it would be like to work there.

2. Does the job offer room to grow within the company?

 

You might learn this from the question above — i.e., the last person in the job got promoted — but if not, this is a really crucial question to ask. Starting over at a new company is a major transition, and you don’t want to have to do this every time you’re ready to climb the ladder. Finding a place where you can grow your career can take a lot of stress out of your professional life.

3. How is success measured in this position?

 

There’s no right or wrong way to define success, but it’s important to make sure your definition matches that of the organization’s. For example, if the company measures success by volume of output, but you value quality over quantity, it might not be the best place for you.

4. What personality type thrives at thrives on this team?

 

The job might look perfect on paper, but if you’re not a match for the company culture, you won’t last. It’d be disappointing to find out the rest of the team has your exact opposite personality type, but it’s better to learn this now than after you’re hired.

5. Which members of the team work closely with this position? Will they play a role in the hiring process?

 

You might get along brilliantly with the hiring manager, but they’re not the only person you’ll be working alongside. Inquiring about those you’d be spending the most time with will help you get a better feel for the job. Finding out whether or not they’ll be included in the hiring process also offers a peak at the company culture and team dynamic.

Ready to take the next step in your engineering, maintenance, or operations management career? MAC Incorporated wants to help you get ahead. Contact us today to start your search for a new challenge that perfectly suits your skills and interests!

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